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2002 Review – Albums #100 – 91

Posted by September 29th, 2003 No Comments »

Parenthesis.2002 Review – Albums #100 – 91
By Nada Staff

100. Sigur Ros ()
So there’s this band from Iceland everybody likes. They’re called Sigur Ros. And get this, they sing in gibberish.

99. Carissa’s Wierd – Songs About Leaving
This Seattle mainstay is bordering on comical in how many times its announced plans to break up or “play a last show,” but part of the reason they can’t seem to drop the hammer might be how much Northwest fans have come to revere their literate indie pop.

Parenthesis.2002 Review – Albums #100 – 91
By Nada Staff

100. Sigur Ros ()
So there’s this band from Iceland everybody likes. They’re called Sigur Ros. And get this, they sing in gibberish.

99. Carissa’s Wierd – Songs About Leaving
This Seattle mainstay is bordering on comical in how many times its announced plans to break up or “play a last show,” but part of the reason they can’t seem to drop the hammer might be how much Northwest fans have come to revere their literate indie pop.

98. The Black Heart Procession – Amore del Tropico
Dark, brooding tales of desperation and despair played by a talented band of musician’s from one of the sunniest city’s in the world, San Diego. Perfect.

97. Imperial Teen – On
Roddy Bottoms post-Faith No More outfit make sleek, sexy, poppy post-punk. Their 2003 release is more keyboard driven than their 1995 classic, Seasick, but has equally good songwriting and a dead cool vibe.

96. The Books – Thought for Food
An indie rock album of the first order, Thought for Food combines guitar, violin, and the occasional banjo or cello with sound samples and dialogue pulled from Jean-Luc Godard films.

95. The Church – After Everything Now This
This is one of those bands you might think would sound dated. You probably listened to them back in Jr High, along with The Smiths and The Cure, and while you’ve got a soft spot for them, you don’t exactly wear out your copy of Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me or Louder Than Bombs these days. Or maybe you do. Regardless, any fears music by Australia’s The Church wouldn’t stay vital into their third decade were summarily erased when the band rocked most of our staff’s asses at the Fenix a few years back. Then, just in case we still weren’t certain, enter 2002’s excellent After Everything Now This. Fitting title.

94. Boards of Canada – Geogaddi
There’s a new category of electronic music. One that many of us have been waiting for since,….well since New Order. We call it “good electronic music.” Leading the more expiremental arm of this movement, along with Add (N) to X, Mouse on Mars
and Doppler Effect, are Boards of Canada. Geogaddi is one of their best.

93. Badly Drawn Boy – About a Boy ST
Damon Gough, who is Badly Drawn Boy, may be a whiny little shit, but he sure does write great songs. Lots of them.

92. The Selby Tigers – The Curse of the Selby Tigers
We love The Selby Tigers. Snotty male/female vocal interplay and brash guitars freshen up their standard pop/punk formula and make this more fun than anything else like it.

91. Hayden – Skyscraper National Park
Perhaps one of the music world’s most under-appreciated musical geniuses, you’d think the fantastic Skyscraper National Park, which went through a Yankee Hotel Foxtrot-like saga involving long delays and label juggling, might have finally earned Hayden his spot in the sun. Sadly, it looks like he’s still a relative unkown. Fight for justice – check this album out.


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