Nada Mucho

Strength In Numbers Sucks! (One Take on the 2005 Seattle Compilation)

Posted by February 21st, 2006 No Comments »

Strength in Numbers, a Cooperative Compilation
By Julia Eaton, Cranky Ex-punk Housewife

The Strength in Numbers compilation is well-put together and well-presented and the concept is a great one – each band pooled their resources in order to get the CD out.

It’s a great way to circumvent the music industry’s cutthroat politics and get one’s music heard, without waiting, often in vain, to be picked up on a whim as some record company’s flavor of the week. I’d love to see more of this from new bands; it really speaks to my inner socialist.

Unfortunately, the strength of the music on this compilation is nowhere near as strong as the concept.

Razrez
The first few seconds made me think I would like Razrez a lot. Then I heard the vocals. I immediately recognized the style and tone of the singer from another performer from the 80’s but I couldn’t place it. Gradually, the music seemed to devolve into a mix of different songs I couldn’t quite place from the 80’s and 90’s.

Strength in Numbers, a Cooperative Compilation
By Julia Eaton, Cranky Ex-punk Housewife

The Strength in Numbers compilation is well-put together and well-presented and the concept is a great one – each band pooled their resources in order to get the CD out.

It’s a great way to circumvent the music industry’s cutthroat politics and get one’s music heard, without waiting, often in vain, to be picked up on a whim as some record company’s flavor of the week. I’d love to see more of this from new bands; it really speaks to my inner socialist.

Unfortunately, the strength of the music on this compilation is nowhere near as strong as the concept.

Razrez
The first few seconds made me think I would like Razrez a lot. Then I heard the vocals. I immediately recognized the style and tone of the singer from another performer from the 80’s but I couldn’t place it. Gradually, the music seemed to devolve into a mix of different songs I couldn’t quite place from the 80’s and 90’s.

I found myself thinking this band was like some retro 70’s clothes in a fashion magazine where I stop and think, “Maybe that is kind of cute.” But it’s just the model who makes anything she wears look cute, even if it’s cat barf.

I really want to like this band. People I respect like them, they’ve gotten good reviews and they recently did a benefit show for homeless youth, but I don’t think I do. I may have to just like them as a concept and skip listening to their music..

The Jeunes
These would be great songs to have playing in the background at a club or bar – the music is pleasant, familiar and repetitive. “Missing Person” left me wanting to listen to Sonic Youth or PIL after hearing shadows of their songs in the musical structure. But it didn’t make me want to hear more from The Jeunes.

Rosyvelt
Like many bands today, Rosyvelt have stylized their songs to fit into a 90’s marketing campaign called Alternative Music. Are they putting any of their soul into their music? And how come so few bands have a lead singer who can carry a tune these days? The only way I’ll ever hear Rosyvelt’s music again is if I happen to be in a public place where it’s playing.

Math and Physics Club
What great name for a band! I was not immediately impressed with their originality though. Was this, the Velvet Underground? Morrissey? The singer definitely has that distinctive morose, monotone singing style down.

Regardless, the music is very pleasant and the melody really sticks in my head. It’s refreshing to hear new bands creating melodies and harmonies instead of relying on the trend for discordance and distortion. Remember, it was new when the Sex Pistols showed up not knowing how to play their instruments. Now it’s just a bunch of guys not knowing how to play their instruments. Math and Physics Club definitely know how to play and how to make music.

C’est La Mort
This is by far my favorite band on the whole compilation and I’m looking forward to hearing more from them. The instrumentals are nice, but nothing that jumped out at me, but the vocal mixes were great and I would’ve been happy with a toy drum machine in the background.

Birds of Prey
The two songs by Birds of Prey were not quite enough to make me go out and buy their CD, but they’re on their way. They have a relaxing, droning, repetitive style that harkens back to Stereolab and My Bloody Valentine. You can just see it right there as a glimmer in front of you. I hope they stay together and keep working on their music. I’d be excited to see how it transforms in the next few years.

Infomatik
Like the local press has said, these guys sure do sound a lot like New Order or Devo depending on the song. For that I give them credit. As a tribute to the synth pop of the 80’s, Infomatik does a great job. As a standalone band hoping to make a name for themselves I don’t think there’s a lot of hope. I fear their chances are about as high as those of the Mac Quadra 605 from 1992 sitting in my basement causing Linux users to oooh and aaaah over its retro beauty for a few minutes before it is forgotten once again in lieu of modern technology.

Bullet Club
Good lord. I do not like Sleater Kinney and the Bullet Club’s singer seems to be Corin Tucker’s long lost brother. At least Sleater Kinney is talented.

Music made up of lots of noise and cacophony from bands such as Einstrurzende Neubauten and early Sonic Youth work because the musicians are skilled and talented and know what they’re doing. Just like the Marx brothers would not be funny if they really were falling all over themselves. I would actually get up and leave an establishment if this band was playing. I hope I never have to listen to them again. – (5/10)


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Copyright © 2017 Nada Mucho